I don’t need training. I know my Mom

What do you do when your mom has Alzheimer’s disease, your father denies it, and your siblings are of no help? Caring for a parent with Alzheimer’s disease has a steep learning curve. Yet may family caregivers feel they “should” be able to handle it—No training needed. You must ask for help. Read what you can get your hands on. Attend support groups. Instead of arguing with someone who has Alzheimer’s disease, use my favorite phrase: “You may be right.” And walk away.

I recently interviewed Pam Brammann, who provides training for family caregivers. She shared with me brain brain images (PET scans). First you see a normal, active brain compared to an Alzheimer’s brain. You see very little activity in the diseased brain. The second set compares a normal infant’s brain to that of someone with late stage Alzheimer’s disease. It becomes clear just why you can’t reason with someone who has Alzheimer’s disease—their brain is working at the level of a 2-year-old.

Normal Brain vs Alzheimer's Brain Late Alzheimer's Brain vs Normal Infant's Brain

As Pam explained in our radio interview, “If a two-year-old runs across the street, you don’t sit that child down and elaborate the dangers of running across a street; the child won’t get it. Same goes for someone with Alzheimer’s disease.” Reasoning with someone who has Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias doesn’t make sense.

Even if you think you know your Mom or Dad, you may not understand how the disease has changed their brain. Getting a little training to better understand the disease and just how you can handle the symptoms (or behaviors) will do wonders to keep you sane.

Categories: Caring for the Caregiver, Dementia, The Unexpected Caregiver Radio Show

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