Category Archives: Caregiver Support Groups

Beating depression by being both busy and engaged

When I have too much down time between projects, I can easily spend more time sleeping or surfing Netflix than is good for me. I get stuck. My depression blooms when I am not engaged in IMG_2826 - Version 2meaningful activities. I lean on my SANE Method*, knowing that the first word, Supported, is crucial to moving through a tough period. I have a circle of safe and positive friends on whom I can call.

I also understand the importance of being busy. I don’t usually subscribe to “busyness for busyness sake,” but at times there is value in simply getting out and doing something—anything. This won’t sustain me in the long run, but it works to move me through to meaningful activities.

Family caregivers can easily fall into variations of a similar trap: thinking that the appearance of their parents being busy trumps the actuality of being involved in an activity that’s engaging and meaningful to them, or thinking that — like some impromptu cruise directors on the Good Ship Getting Older — it’s somehow now up to the children to constantly be planning activities for mom and dad.

Don’t get me wrong. There’s plenty of value, mental and physical, in spending time with your parents to help them stay active and busy. But I believe it’s the “slow times” and the hours when your folks are on their own, pursuing their own interests in their own ways, that provide the greatest payoffs for their emotional and bodily health.

Just as is true with yourself, the goal is to help your parents get into things they will find enjoyable over the longer term — including activities they might do solo and under their own direction — because those are the ones they’ll do regularly and sustain by themselves.

If you notice your parents isolating themselves more and more, try opening a conversation about what brings meaning to their lives. And ask them how you can support them. Your support — whether is be simply listening to them or assisting them with ideas — can be one of the single most important things you do for your parents.

*Supported, Appreciated, Not guilty and Energized.

 

 

 

 

No, You can’t do it by yourself: 5 Tips for Caregiver Support

 

My mom burst into tears in the middle of a restaurant dinner and instead of asking, “What’s wrong,” I was embarrassed. I thought, “Why can’t she pull herself together?” My mom had a disease called Huntington’s disease, which renders its victims incapable of acting what many call “normal.”

If you take care of someone with a disease that causes dementia, you are not living a “normal” life and caregiving is therefore doubly challenging. You may think, “He’s doing this just to drive me crazy,” when in reality the repetitive questions or unpredictable behavior are not malicious. You’ve known this person for years and now you are their caregiver—helping with daily tasks, while getting to know someone who is actually a very different new person.

Think of it this way: Do you ever get really frustrated at a vending machine when it won’t take your dollar bill? You straighten out the bill, insert it again, and it just keeps spitting it back, even though the bill looks fine? Your loved one may also look fine on the outside, but their brain is not working the way it used to. You need to find a new way of being with him or her, while you simultaneously figure out how to take care of yourself.

I know you want to scream. Some days you even yell at your loved one, but that only adds to your stress. This is why you must find support—a person or a group which allows you space to say all the things you simply can not say directly to your loved one. Being supported along your caregiving journey is the first step in being a S.A.N.E. caregiver—Supported, Appreciated, Not guilty and Energized. Start by finding support for yourself:

  1. Educate yourself about the disease so you know what to expect.
  2. Let off steam with a trusted friend.
  3. Set aside a half-hour a day to do something just for you.
  4. Join a support group (or start one).
  5. Find ways to laugh every day.

You know you would do anything to help out someone in your shoes. It’s time to take that same spirit of helpfulness and turn it inwards. Ask for help and let others support you.

Caregiver support online

CaregivingNOW_OnlineConvoBannerWebSmallThere is a forum where you can get support on your caregiving journey. And if you’re not a caregiver (yet), I’m sure you know someone who is. Sign up here and join the conversation: http://unitedfrontmn.org/caregivingnow/.

We tend to avoid having the conversations around giving care because we feel we ‘should’ be able to do this without assistance from others. Well, that’s just not the case. We all need help when caring for someone else, lest we lose ourselves in the process.

November has been deemed National Caregivers Month and I sincerely hope that this one month of highlighting the often-times tough journey of family caregivers expands the understanding of this role.

Join me today for a special 3-day conversation focused on helping you create more joyful holidays with clearer boundaries. As always, if you want one on one help, click here. And if you’re looking for an on-going support group, check this out.

We All Need Support On Our Caregiving Journey

I can’t take it any more!
I don’t know what I’m doing.
I feel like a failure!

Statements like these are what I routinely hear from family caregivers. We are not trained to do this job and yet we think we “should” be able to do it on our own. When we get frustrated and don’t know what to do, who do we turn to?

I’ve been developing the Unexpected Caregiver Support groups—so that family caregivers can meet once a week and understand that they’re not alone. In these peer-to-peer run groups, I have seen family caregivers let out huge sighs of relief and gratefulness, knowing that they share this journey with many others. That their feelings aren’t unusual or crazy. And in these groups they can speak their feelings and trust that what is said in the group, stays with the group. We have built little communities of trust.

When you’re giving care to a family member, it’s not uncommon for your past issues to resurface. All those unresolved issues of childhood come bubbling up to present day and you are stuck with an overload of emotions. What do you do with the feelings? Who will understand?

Caregiver support is crucial. You can receive one-on-one support from me or I can help you start a support group. Contact me. I’m here to help.

Boosting brain health in Salt Lake City, UT

A 10-year-old asks questions about dementia

http://www.slcolibrary.org/le/lelp/index.htm

It wasn’t coffee that got me going today. My brain was in gear as I followed carefully plotted directions of how to get from the Avenues in Salt Lake City, UT, to the Sandy Library, about 30 miles south. I don’t know about you, but driving Interstates in an unfamiliar city with hand-written notes of how to get “there” shifts my brain into drive. Read more »

Kari Berit on KARE 11’s Showcase Minnesota – Tune in Tuesday November 23, 2010 at 10 AM

November is National Family Caregiving Month and Kari Berit is spreading the word that America needs to discuss caregiving. More than 65 million people are caregivers in America. Read more »