Monthly Blog Archives: September 2017

Why it’s important to hold a family meeting

I’ve been involved in several family caregiver meetings, including one with my own family when my Grandpa Gus needed care. My goals were simple: Air emotions and make a plan. I opened the meeting by having us go around the table and check in. After each person was able to express feelings, we made sure everyone was clear about grandpa’s diagnosis and what he needed for care. We then allocated the tasks among us. Even though the tasks didn’t end up being accomplished exactly as assigned, it helped to have everybody aware of how much needed to be done. Here are some of the things you and your siblings may be called upon to do:

  • Help with activities of daily living (bathing, eating, getting up, using the bathroom, dressing);
  • Drive to and from (whether to doctor or social activity)
  • Organize medication
  • Financial help
  • Assist with housing (from housekeeping to finding a new living situation)
  • Manage insurance and health care
  • Shop, do laundry, cut grass, etc.
  • Use technology to make life simpler (but more challenging for you to re set, explain, update your parent’s devices)
  • Advocate for your parents
  • Understand any disease, so that you can be a better caregiver
  • Support each other and yourself

I remember facilitating a family caregiving meeting for five adult children and a number of support people. The primary caregiver was tired and wanted her siblings to understand that, by keeping their father on life support, they were not only going against his wishes, but also extending her role to the point of exhaustion. When two of her siblings said that she didn’t need to be at the hospital all the time, she was furious. “Who’s going to catch the mistakes?” she raged. “Who’s going to hold dad’s hand? Who’s going to catch the doctor when he comes by if I’m not there?”

Her need was to be heard and understood, especially when she felt the rest of the family was going against their father’s final wishes. But her siblings needed her to understand that while she had taken on the primary role, it wasn’t an exclusive one. Just as she needed to be there, they also needed to be able to help out and be involved in their own unique ways.

It’s worth noting that even if you’re prepared to play the primary role, it may not always be what’s needed. I could not have taken care of my mother full-time and it was not the right spot for me to play lead with my sister’s care. Don’t let your ego get in the way. Examine the family dynamics and choose the best person for each role. Get in touch if you need help.